The Interactive Kiosk Project Yrs 7-8  (CoP043)
Description
Address a whole range of curriculum ideas with this fabulously flexible project. Use the kiosk functions in PowerPoint as an easily implemented development platform or select some dedicated software. Core requirements include research, decomposition, functional and visual design, and the testing of ideas. Optional components include collaborating, sustainable technology, timelines, programming, accessibility, prototypes, backups and social, environmental and economic objectives.

Files: Research / Collaboration / Selecting Solutions / Kiosk Project Plan / Kiosk Functions / Pattern Recognition / Flowcharts and Algorithms / Wireframes / Visual Design / Accessibility / Trialling Designs / Building and Testing / Saving Energy / Evaluation / Appendices: Office Online / Kiosk Functions / Button Layering / Programming

Includes full answers + all solution PowerPoints developed in the tutorial section. The premium packages include the fixed PDF files as well as the editable Word versions (great for teacher editing or student answers).
Free Samples
Preview
MouseOver > Large Image
Click > Free Sample
 
Purchases(?)  
Basic (Fixed) (?)8MB $99 Add
Premium (Editable) (?)18MB $149 Add
GST Included   View
Curriculum Links

 
Digital Technologies
 

 
0. Teacher notes
 

 
0. Checklist
 

 
1. Research
 
Predict and evaluate their developed and existing solutions
 
Evaluate how student solutions and existing information systems meet needs, are innovative, and take account of future risks and sustainability (ACTDIP031)
 
Considering the effects of e-waste on societies and environments, for example the impacts of toxic chemicals when hardware is disposed of, and the practice of dumping unwanted digital systems overseas, particularly in the Asia region
 

 
2. Collaboration
 
Plan and manage individual and team projects with some autonomy
 
Communicating and collaborating online, students develop an understanding of different social contexts, for example acknowledging cultural practices and meeting legal obligations.
 
Use appropriate protocols when communicating and collaborating online.
 
Establishing a set of 'rules' about acceptable and unacceptable behaviour when collaborating online, for example only applying tags to images of other people with their permission or considering social protocols of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People
 

 
3. Selecting Solutions
 
Starting from a simplified system, gradually increase complexity until a model of a real-world system is developed, and record the difficulties associated with each stage of implementation
 
Documenting and sequencing the tasks that need to be done
 
Devising and applying protocols to manage the collaborative creation of solutions, for example planning to use cloud computing to store common files .
 

 
4. Kiosk Project Plan
 
Plan and manage projects that create and communicate ideas and information collaboratively online, taking safety and social contexts into account (ACTDIP032)
 
Plan and manage digital projects to create interactive information
 
Test, modify and implement digital solutions
 
Ways of managing the exchange of ideas, tasks and files
 
Design the user experience of a digital system, generating, evaluating and communicating alternative designs (ACTDIP028)
 
Documenting and sequencing the tasks that need to be done and the resources that are needed to collaboratively create solutions including organising the timeline, devising file naming conventions and planning backup measures
 
Define and decompose problems in terms of functional requirements and constraints
 
Defining problems, key elements, factors and constraints
 
Identifying that problems can be decomposed into sub elements, for example creating a decision tree to represent the breakdown and relationships of sub elements to the main problem or identifying the elements of game design such as characters, movements, collisions and scoring
 
Define and decompose real-world problems taking into account functional requirements and economic, environmental, social, technical and usability constraints (ACTDIP027)
 

 
5. Kiosk Functions
 
Devising and applying protocols to manage the collaborative creation of solutions, for example planning to use cloud computing to store common files.
 

 
6. Pattern Recognition
 
Identifying common elements
 
Predict and evaluate their developed and existing solutions
 
Identifying similar digital systems and their user interfaces, assessing whether user interface elements can be re-used
 

 
7. Flowcharts and Algorithms
 
Using diagrams to describe key decisions, for example creating flowcharts using digital systems to describe a set of computational instructions
 
Design algorithms incorporating branching and iterations
 
Design algorithms represented diagrammatically and in English, and trace algorithms to predict output for a given input and to identify errors (ACTDIP029)
 
Abstractions hide irrelevant details for particular purposes
 

 
8. Wireframes
 
Designing the user interface of a solution using a range of design tools, for example using a storyboard to explain the stages of a game, and wire-frames and mock-ups to describe the appearance of a solution
 
Design the user experience of a digital system, generating, evaluating and communicating alternative designs (ACTDIP028)
 

 
9. Visual Design
 
Applying the principles and elements of design to a series of solutions to evaluate the success of each solution to hold the viewer's attention, for example identifying which colour combinations or framing of visual elements keep different audiences engaged with on-screen activity
 

 
10. Accessibility
 
Consider different users with limited abilities or languages
 
Progress from designing the user interface to considering user experience factors such as user expertise, accessibility and usability requirements.
 
Investigating what features of touch input rather than keyboard or mouse input contribute to their success in meeting a wide range of needs, for example mimicking a common movement such as expanding or contracting a hand to change the size of an object on screen, suits users with a range of dexterity
 

 
11. Trialling Designs
 
Design different layouts & colours and develop a method of collecting data about which is most popular.
 
Applying the principles and elements of design to a series of solutions to evaluate the success of each solution to hold the viewer's attention, for example identifying which colour combinations or framing of visual elements keep different audiences engaged with on-screen activity
 
Presenting and comparing alternative designs to a solution for a problem, for example presenting alternative design mock-ups to the class
 
Devising file naming conventions and planning backup measures
 
Presenting and comparing alternative designs to a solution for a problem, for example presenting alternative design mock-ups to the class
 
Prototyping
 

 
12. Building and Testing
 

 
13. Saving Energy
 
Investigating types of environmental constraints of solutions, for example reducing energy consumption and on-screen output of solutions
 

 
14. Evaluation
 
Evaluating the success of information systems in meeting an economic, environmental or social objective, for example interviewing a local business owner to find out how effectively their information system supports a business objective such as increasing market share
 
Judging the quality of a student solution based on specific criteria such as meeting an economic need or contributing to social sustainability
 
Devising and applying protocols to manage the collaborative creation of solutions, for example establishing virtual meetings that acknowledge time zone differences
 
Comparing student solutions with existing solutions that solve similar problems, for example identifying differences in the user interface of two adventure games and explaining how these differences affect the usability or appeal of the game
 

 
A1. Appendix 1 - Office Online
 

 
A2. Appendix 2 - PowerPoint Kiosk Functions
 

 
A3. Appendix 3 - Button Layering
 
Creating digital solutions that provide user navigation and prompts with controlled repetitions, for example an information kiosk that has layers of buttons and prompts the user three times before returning to the beginning
 

 
A4. Appendix 4 - PowerPoint Programming
 

 
A5. Appendix 5 - PowerPoint Patterns
 
Send a link to selected friends
ORB Education. Teaching and Learning made Easy
Free and priced teaching resources. Teach with our worksheets, PowerPoints, lessons and interactive resources for school and distance learning.
 

 
 

 
 

PURCHASING INFORMATION

 

Closed and Open Licenses

ORB Education resources are provided with full site licenses, enabling you to view resources on your interactive whiteboards, share on your networks, print and photocopy or place on your protected school intranet. Our Open Licences also allow you to copy resources to student laptops, place them on a protected website and email them to students.  You may purchase an open licence for either the Basic or Premium resources at a cost of 30% extra.  See our Typical Licence for more information.

 

Back to Top

 

Basic (Fixed) or Premium (Editable)?

Basic resources are for printing or using in their present state. You are not offered permission to digitally edit the materials. Resources are forwarded as fixed pdf documents or password protected files.

Premium Resources can be altered, dissected, collated or added to your own materials (with one or two exceptions). Resources are forwarded as Word files, Publisher files or with the passwords necessary to edit the materials.

Please note: Premium versions of individual resources are not available.  You will need to purchase a Pack or Set to obtain editable copies.

 

Back to Top

 

Pack or Bulk Buy Set?

The resources in a Pack have been created by a single author. Packs normally consist of between 20 and 70 worksheets, or about the equivalent in other digital forms.  Packs can be requested through mailorder or via download from our website.

To simplify bulk purchases, packs are sometimes collected together and made available as a Set.

Back to Top

 

Credit Card Purchases

We accept the following credit cards.

CC

Our order system uses the 'PayPal' system. PayPal is trusted by over 100 million people worldwide.  ORB Education receives no information about your Credit Card.

 

Back to Top

Mailorder Purchases

Mailorders are available to all school teachers in Australia. You may include a school order form or order number when requesting resources.

School orders will be sent to a school email address with an invoice along with download links for your selected products. Payments can be made using the following methods:

 - Credit Card
 - Bank Transfer
 - Cheque

GST is additional to the prices shown.

NOTE: Please ensure that you include a school email address with all mailorders.

Click here to open the Mailorder window.

 

Back to Top